Tag Archives: Dryocopus pileatus

Pileated 2020-07-20

I heard a thwacking sound, looked up from the porch desk, and two pileated woodpeckers were on two, then one, pine tree.

[Two pileated woodpeckers on a pine tree]
Two pileated woodpeckers on a pine tree

The crosshatching is the porch screen wire.

These Dryocopus pileatus hang around here all the time, but they don’t usually come that close. That pine tree stob is about twenty feet outside the screen, or thirty (ten meters) from where I was sitting.

Eventually they flew off laughing, like they do.

Pileated woodpeckers mate for life, which would explain why this pair has been here a long time.

Don’t know if it’s always been the same pair, since we’ve been seeing them more than a decade, and apparently the oldest know was less than thirteen years old.

A pair of pileateds wants more than a hundred acres of territory, so they should be very happy here.

-jsq

Pileated vs. Ivory Billed Woodpeckers

There is some confusion of the Lord God Bird, the Ivory Billed Woodpecker that was thought extinct until the 1940s until 2004, with our local Pileated Woodpecker. They are similar colors and similar size:
Pileated WoodPecker
(Dryocopus pileatus)
Flying: Dark trailing wing edge
Perched: Small white patch
Length: 16-19 in.
Wing span: 26-30 in.
Ivory-billed Woodpecker
(Campephilus principalis)
Flying: White trailing wing edge
Perched: Large white patch
Length: 18-20 in.
Wing span: 30-33 in.
Above illustrations by N. John Schmitt Ā© Cornell Lab of Ornithology

You can clearly see when this bird flew overhead it had a black trailing wing edge: Continue reading

Pair of Pileateds in a Pine Tree

What are these, climbing turkeys? They’re almost big enough.

Or maybe a pair of Southern Pileated Woodpeckers (Dryocopus pileatus) on a longleaf pine (Pinus Palustris).

I got pretty close; they just laughed. Eventually I walked away to do something else, and they flew into another tree directly over my head, where you see them in this video:


Pileated Woodpeckers, Dryocopus pileatus, Lowndes County, Georgia.
Pictures by John S. Quarterman, 7 November 2011.

-jsq