Category Archives: Arachnids

Scorpion 2021-08-21

“It’s stinging me!” screeched Gretchen as she rushed into the house.

Yes, “screeched” is the word she later used to describe the loud noise she made.

[On the sink]
On the sink

As you can see, she then managed to fling this Striped Bark Scorpion off her, but the Centruroides vittatus landed on the sink.

Like the one I stepped on recently, this one hurt like a bee sting, but caused no noticeable damage by the next morning.

The amusing part is that Gretchen did not get this scorpion here at the farm.

She got it in downtown Valdosta.

-jsq

Scorpion

Seen while picking corn, about two inches long, and would not stay still:

Would not stay still On tire

Pictures by John S. Quarterman for Okra Paradise Farms, Lowndes County, Georgia, 12 October 2012.

Did you know scorpions are not insects? They're arachnids: eight legs, like spiders.

-jsq

Bathroom spider

The spider that keeps insects out of the bathroom:

The spider that keeps insects out of the bathroom

The spider that keeps insects out of the bathroom
Pictures by John S. Quarterman for Okra Paradise Farms, Lowndes County, Georgia, 8 July 2012.

It likes that little stool I put there for it! Some people have aquariums….

-jsq

A Call for Skepticism

Camano Island is NW of Everett, Washington, and this article is from 2002, responding to an article in the local paper there. -jsq
Commentary
A Call for Skepticism
by Steven K. Roberts
Camano Island

If ever we needed a demonstration that the fundamental flaw in many arguments is a lack of discrimination regarding information sources, we have it in the Nels Konnerup article, “Toxicology 101 Defended,” in the March 26 issue of the S/C News.

The author makes a “plea for cogent thought, rather than a visceral reaction to the use of pesticides and herbicides,” and cites a number of references “authored by highly qualified and respected scientists.” So far, so good.

But just for fun, I spent a few minutes researching some of these sources to see if I could determine the affiliations and biases of their authors.

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