Tag Archives: Economy

Early registration extended to January 15th! –South Georgia Growing Local 2014

Early registration extended to January 15th!

Update 2 January 2014: Or pay online.

You can sign up here to see the goats, bees, chickens, ham, eggs, fruits, seeds, textiles, rain, and sun, and let’s not forget the worms!

Continue reading

South Georgia Growing Local for Christmas

How about a registration for South Georgia Growing Local 2014 as a Christmas gift?

Have fun and support the local economy on the Farm Tour (citrus, sheep, olives, and row crops) Friday 24 January 2014, plus also dinner and a movie.

Learn a lot, eat well with the local community at the talks Saturday 25 January 2014, about animals, orchards, gardens, health, farmer experiences, and policy.

You can register using this form.

And you can join events on facebook so everybody can see you’re going.

Here’s the conference flyer for more information: Continue reading

South Georgia Growing Local 2014

What has about 300 heads and eats really well? A local agriculture conference coming to Lowndes County 24 January 2014.

South Georgia Growing Local 2014 is a local food conference for growers, consumers, homesteaders in South Georgia. Farm Tours 1/24 — Conference 1/25

You can like the facebook page and join events there for the conference itself on January 25th and for the farm tours on January 24th. Agritourism has come to Lowndes County! This is one reason a wide variety of organizations, including two Chambers of Commerce, are supporting this conference: it will fill hotel rooms. Even more, it’s about longterm local economy through growing and buying food right here in south Georgia and north Florida. All that and it tastes good, too!

26 January 2013 in Reidsville Continue reading

Junk food is engineered to be addictive

This is why there is an epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease in the U.S.: food deliberately engineered to make people eat until they get fat. Georgia is not quite one of the fattest states, but Lowndes County is one of the fattest counties. There is something we can do, even while Big Food continues to act like Big Tobacco.

Michael Moss wrote for NYTimes 20 February 2013, The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food,

On the evening of April 8, 1999, a long line of Town Cars and taxis pulled up to the Minneapolis headquarters of Pillsbury and discharged 11 men who controlled America’s largest food companies. NestlĂ© was in attendance, as were Kraft and Nabisco, General Mills and Procter & Gamble, Coca-Cola and Mars. Rivals any other day, the C.E.O.’s and company presidents had come together for a rare, private meeting. On the agenda was one item: the emerging obesity epidemic and how to deal with it. While the atmosphere was cordial, the men assembled were hardly friends. Their stature was defined by their skill in fighting one another for what they called “stomach share” — the amount of digestive space that any one company’s brand can grab from the competition.

James Behnke, a 55-year-old executive at Pillsbury, greeted the men as they arrived. He was anxious but also hopeful about the plan that he and a few other food-company executives had devised to engage the C.E.O.’s on America’s growing weight problem. “We were very concerned, and rightfully so, that obesity was becoming a major issue,” Behnke recalled. “People were starting to talk about sugar taxes, and there was a lot of pressure on food companies.” Getting the company chiefs in the same room to Continue reading

99% of U.S. PCBs produced by Monsanto, and MON knew they were toxic

Monsanto knew PCBs were toxic as it manufactured almost all of them, much like Roundup now. Monsanto drenched the town of Anniston, Alabama in PCBs and never told them. Guess where that pipeline through Georgia from Alabama to Florida starts? That’s right: Anniston, Alabama.

According to CDC Toxicological Profile for Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), November 2000, “Approximately 99% of the PCBs used by U.S. industry were produced by the Monsanto Chemical Company in Sauget, Illinois, until production was stopped in August 1977.”

By Michael Grunwald in Washington Post Tuesday, January 1, 2002; Page A01, Monsanto Hid Decades Of Pollution: PCBs Drenched Ala. Town, But No One Was Ever Told ( original URL no longer works), Continue reading

Monsanto crops: same as and different from natural crops?

If Monsanto’s crops are indistinguishable from non-GMO, aren’t natural crops prior art invalidating MON’s patents?

Ethan A. Huff wrote for NaturalNews.com 26 June 2013, Monsanto hypocrisy: GMOs supposedly identical to natural crops on safety, but unique for patent enforcement,

The biotechnology industry has pulled a fast one with regards to the legitimacy of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs). Straddling both sides of the fence, multinational corporations like Monsanto continually claim that their GM monstrosities are “substantially equivalent” to natural crops when it comes to their safety. And yet at the very same time, this ilk also insists that its products are uniquely different from natural crops when it comes to enforcing its patents, a clearly hypocritical and duplicitous stance that proves the illegitimacy of the entire GMO business model.

On its corporate website, Monsanto clearly expresses its opinion that Continue reading

Mallory blueberries on WCTV 2012-06-25

More blueberries than peaches in Georgia fruit production, featured on WCTV and at Valdosta Farm Days.

Eames Yates wrote for WCTV 25 June 2012 Blueberries Overtake Peaches as Georgia’s Largest Fruit Crop,

The Georgia peach has been bumped from the top spot when it comes to fruit production in the state. The new leader of the pack: Blueberries, which are now the number one selling fruit crop in Georgia.

Georgia has more than 19,000 acres of blueberries. And about 12,000 acres of peaches. The Mallory’s operate a blueberry farm in Valdosta. So far this year they’ve sold about 1,200 gallons of blueberries worth more than $9,000 dollars.

Mallory’s Farm owner Shirley Mallory said Continue reading

Bee-killing pesticides banned in Europe

How long will it take the U.S. to follow Europe’s ban of neonicotinoid pesticides, putting health of bees and food crop pollination ahead of corporate profit?

Damian Carrington wrote for the Guardian today, Bee-harming pesticides banned in Europe: EU member states vote ushers in continent-wide suspension of neonicotinoid pesticides,

Europe will enforce the world’s first continent-wide ban on widely used insecticides linked to serious harm in bees, after a European commission vote on Monday.

The landmark suspension is a victory for millions of environment campaigners concerned about dramatic declines in bees who were backed by experts at the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). But it is a serious defeat for the chemical companies who make billions a year from the products and also UK ministers—who voted against the ban. Both had argued the ban will harm food production.

The vote by the 27 member states of the European Union to suspend the insect nerve agents was supported by 15 nations, but did not reach the required majority under EU voting rules. The hung vote hands the final decision to the European commission (EC) who will implement the ban. “It’s done,” said an EC source.

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Lowndes County next year: SoGa Growing Local & Sustainable Conference

Janisse Ray starting the conference This year’s SoGa Growing Local & Sustainable Conference was a satisfying success, and next year it moves to Lowndes County.

Not only did 260 people sign up, but all the sessions were well-attended, and everybody seemed to learn something new, from hoop houses to solar power, from hands-on workshops to all-hands plenary sessions. Of course the food was excellent. You can get a hint from this picture of Janisse Ray opening the conference; the food in the foreground is on the snack tables (ah, the honeycomb!). Then there were the meals, potluck by and for a conference-full of foodies.

In 2011 about 50 people came to the first one in Tifton. In 2012, about 150 people went to Reidsville. In 2013, about 260 people signed up, also for Reidsville, Tattnall County, to learn what it takes to grow local sustainable food here below the gnat line in this longleaf pine land of tea-colored rivers, acid soil, and rich gardening traditions.

As Janisse Ray wrote on the facebook event for this year’s conference:

Gretchen Quarterman on preserving foods

SoGa Growing Local 2014 will be held in Valdosta, GA. Gretchen Quarterman will be the lead organizer. We’ll be keeping you posted on the date so you can put it on your calendars now. (We may do a mini version in Tattnall in 2014.)

More later on what happened at this year’s conference, and more as it develops on next year’s conference. So far, many local farmers, civic and business organizations, and local governmental bodies have offered to help, and Gretchen is forming an organizational committee. Stay tuned!

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